Rexleigh Bridge. Super-ultra-wide. Raskolnikov. Успіх!

When I work on a photo project, I keep battling it and battling it and battling it until I finally get the results I crave.  Such has been the case with my weekend trips to Washington County to photograph the historic Rexleigh Covered Bridge.  I couldn’t get the foliage shot I wanted, mostly because there really wasn’t much foliage to work with.  I couldn’t get the autumn shots I wanted, mostly because there wasn’t enough snow on the ground.

Last Sunday … there was plenty of dustings on the snowy roads.  Enough of a dusting… to try one more time.

I loaded my Krasnogorsk FT-2 super-ultra-wide camera “Raskolnikov” with a strip of Kodak Ektar 100 film.  I figured I should be able to snag something from this … and all I need to achieve is a totally centralized and amazing super-ultra-wide capture.

It’s all going to depend, of course, upon whether I’ve taken everything into consideration.  All the little things.  Loading the camera properly.  Mounting it securely on the tripod.  Getting that exposure just right.

If it works … I put it in the short pile.

If it REALLY works … I print the damn picture and guarantee it for Competition Season 2018.  Hey, there’s at least three competitions that have panorama categories, so why not?

Sunday morning.  Temperature is freezing.  I think the Celsius and Fahrenheit numbers were equivalent.

No matter.  Gotta drive.  Gotta get this image.  This may be the perfect amount of snow for my shot.  Not a blanket of snow that leaves me with an igloo where a covered bridge would be.  Not a light dusting that barely shows off the weather.

One hour later … I’m in Washington County.  And it’s colder outside than when I left.

Okay.  Get the tripod out of the car.  Set things up.  Nobody’s around.

Raskolnikov’s loaded and ready.  I figure I’ll get at least nine shots, and if I bracket the exposures …

I will not give up.  Not now.

Okay.  Snap.  Wind.  Snap.  Move.  Snap.  Wind.  Snap.  Move.  Brr.  Snap.  Brr.

About fifteen minutes later, I put Raskolnikov back in the car.

Time to drop the film off at McGreevy Pro Lab.

Thursday afternoon … I got the message.  Film is ready for pickup.

And, after scanning the pictures … and adjusting some levels with PhotoShop…

A shot from the right side.  By the way, you can click on these pictures to see them in BIG SIZE on your monitor.

Rexleigh Bridge in Winter 1. Krasnogorsk FT-2 camera, Kodak Ektar 100 film. Photo (c) Chuck Miller, all rights reserved.

Decent…  Let’s get a little closer and convert this into black and white with a red filter.

Rexleigh Bridge in Winter 2. Krasnogorsk FT-2 camera, Kodak Ektar 100 film. Photo (c) Chuck Miller, all rights reserved.

Ooh.  How about one at the left side?

Rexleigh Bridge in Winter 4. Krasnogorsk FT-2 camera, Kodak Ektar 100 film. Photo (c) Chuck Miller, all rights reserved.

All right, let’s go for broke, straight forward, and give it a high contrast monochrome taste.

Rexleigh Bridge in Winter 3. Krasnogorsk FT-2 camera, Kodak Ektar 100 film. Photo (c) Chuck Miller, all rights reserved.

Я отримав фото закритого мосту! Я отримав фото закритого мосту! Боги посміхаються на мене!  Ця фотографія напевно буде в купі на змагання!

So excited by these photos, I’m actually celebrating in my camera’s native dialect.

Especially Rexleigh 3.  I like this picture so much … I’ve updated my blog post header to include it as a topper.  That’s commitment.

I got a good feeling about Competition Season 2018, with shots like this.  And yeah, when I get around to panorama views … Rexleigh Bridge in Winter 3 is in the mix for sure.

For sure.