The Contents of Solarcan #369

Remember how I said that I acquired FIVE Solarcan passive photography cameras?  Yes.  I installed four of them in one location in Menands. Last December, I installed the fifth one in downtown Albany. And here’s the installation. Right on the Hudson and Green parking garage, with a clear view of downtown Albany.  Well, at least…

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The Contents of Solarcan #370

Recap.  Way back in July, I installed several Solarcans – passive cameras made out of pinhole-poked beer cans and photo-sensitive paper – and set them up in various locations around St. Agnes Cemetery in Menands. After a three-month soak, I removed Solarcan #367 from its post, scanned in the contents, and got a halfway-decent picture…

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The Contents of Solarcan #367

Three months ago, I installed several “Solarcan” pinhole cameras around the Albany area.  The goal of these pinhole cameras was to capture the sun as it streaks through the sky, capturing it as a long solar blast from solstice to solstice. Three months later … I’m ready to harvest one of the cameras and examine…

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The Solarcan Project: A year-long photographic experience

A few months ago, I backed a Kickstarter campaign for the Solarcan, a mass-produced pinhole camera that will capture a very long exposure – instead of minutes or hours, this camera is designed to capture an image over a period of months. The Solarcan was created by Sam Cornwell, who initiated the Kickstarter campaign to…

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Microscopy wth a Zhong Yi Mitakon macro lens

The photo you see here was taken with the most powerful marco lens I’ve ever owned, a Zhong Yi Mitakon super-macro lens.  Its most powerful setting – four and a half times normal size. I am not kidding. Four and a half freakin’ times normal size.  Holy John C. Holmes, Batman… Anyways, Zhong Yi Optics,…

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North Pearl and Columbia Streets in the 19th Century

Of late, I’ve been absorbed by the discipline of stereoscopic photography – creating three-dimensional images with film prints, and using some sort of viewer or printing technique to recreate the 3-D effect. The other day, I came across a vintage Albany-themed 3-D stereoview card from the “American Scenery” series, and although the print is somewhat…

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